Project description

The Earth’s magnetic field cannot be explained by a flat earther. How it works is complicated. But, with the help of 3 compasses, it is very easy to show that the magnetic field shows that the earth is not flat.

Financing

The project fully completed will cost 1000 euros, more details below. These are sent in via paypal donate@arcticreflection.org.

Donated so far

0
Euro

The magnetic poles

The North Magnetic Pole is a point on the surface of Earth’s Northern Hemisphere at which the planet’s magnetic field points vertically downwards (in other words, if a magnetic compass needle is allowed to rotate about a horizontal axis, it will point straight down). There is only one location where this occurs, near (but distinct from) the Geographic North Pole. The Geomagnetic North Pole a related point, is the pole of an ideal dipole model of the Earth’s magnetic field that most closely fits the Earth’s actual magnetic field.

The North Magnetic Pole moves over time according to magnetic changes and flux lobe elongation in the Earth’s outer core. In 2001, it was determined by the Geological Survey of Canada to lie west of Ellesmere Island in northern Canada. In 2009, while still situated within the Canadian Arctic at 84°54′N 131°00′W, it was moving toward Russia at between 55 and 60 km (34 and 37 mi) per year. As of 2019, the pole is projected to have moved beyond the Canadian Arctic to 86°26′52.8″N 175°20′45.06″E.

Its southern hemisphere counterpart is the South Magnetic Pole. Since Earth’s magnetic field is not exactly symmetrical, the North and South Magnetic Poles are not antipodal, meaning that a straight line drawn from one to the other does not pass through the geometric center of Earth.

The compass needle

In order to get an accurate reading from a compass, the compass needle needs to be “balanced” in the capsule, so it does not drag on the top or bottom of the capsule. But, because the horizontal and vertical components of the earth’s magnetic field vary considerably in different locations, a compass needle that “balances” perfect in North America will drag or stick in South America. As a result of these magnetic variances, the compass industry has divided the earth into 5 “zones”, as identified in the map. 

The compasses we will use

Silva Expedition S is a high quality compass. It is sold in 3 variants for different parts of the world. One for the northern hemisphere, one for the south and one for the areas around the equator.

3 compasses will be sent to each participant. One of each variant.

Implementation of the project

The goal is to conduct experiments in all 5 zones. (see map above). Each participant receives 5 compasses sent to them. So 15 compasses are needed. Cost per compass is 60 euros. Including the cost of sending the compasses, it will be a total of about 1000 euros.

The financing is done with donations via Paypal. The goal is 1000 Euros.
On the first of December, the collection is completed and the project enters the implementation phase.
If we do not have participants in all 5 zones, we will carry out the project with those we have. We have already covered the northernmost and southernmost zone. Which will be a clear result.

Right now we have received donations of 100 euros.

After the first of December, all compasses are purchased.
These will be tested, documented and marked in Lofoten, Norway. North of 68 degrees.

All compasses will be filmed and photographed to show how they behave.

Then 3 are sent to each participant. One of each variant (see above).

When the compasses reach the participants, they lay them out next to each other and document how each comass behaves. What position does the needles have? All compasses are marked so it is then possible to compare with how they behaved in the Arctic parts of Norway.
Then all the pictures and videos are sent to me. I then compile the result which is published both on this page and as a video on Youtube.

Secondary experiment

Magnetic declination, sometimes called magnetic variation, is the angle between magnetic north and true north. Declination is positive east of true north and negative when west. Magnetic declination changes over time and with location. As the compass points with local magnetic fields, declination value is needed to obtain true north. We can check this with all participants as well, and document it. This will be described more carefully later.

If we do not reach 1000 euros

If we do not reach 1000 euros, then we have to send compasses between the different participants.

So the experiments will be carried out. We already have almost 2 compasses financed. Arctic will pay for at least 1 compass.

Do you want to help?

You can help in different ways.
Donate money. Paypal: donate@arcticreflection.org

Do you want to be involved in carrying out the experiment? Use this form.